Tag Archive: Corel Painter


LionHeart Three

What makes one paint a particular subject? I believe it is both complex and simple. In the case of this work, I wanted to do something based on the Guennol Lioness sculpture, dating back to 3000 BC Iran. I saw a photo of the sculpture in one of my art books and was captivated by it. The idea had been rattling around in my creative brain for at least a year, but I wasn’t sure how to render it. The sculpture is very simple yet powerful. How to create a 2D painting that had the same qualities yet retained a sense of originality and modernity?

Then I stumbled upon this story of the sale at Sotheby’s for $57 Million dollars, the most money ever paid for a sculpture! Amazing. You can copy this link into your browser and read the story with three high resolution photos of this beautiful and powerful piece of ancient art.

http://futuremodern.blogspot.com/2007/12/guennol-lioness-oh-my.html

This work is probably a progressing one, as it feels incomplete. I often will spend time re-rendering my digital paintings and saving many versions until I hit on the right one. This process can unfold over long periods of time.

Recently I was looking at astrological charts and realized that Mars was returning to Leo, where it was at my birth time. The energy was there to paint a Lion figure, part of my personal mythology. I felt that the Lion needed to be male, as am I, so I added a mane. The golden color represents nobility, an attribute of the lion and of the sign Leo. My idea was to keep it simple….gold on black or maybe deep, dark blue. Black won the toss. The most recent version is available as LionHeart Eight on this blog. MyArtistEgo thanks you.

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Here are the commonly known facts about this painting, found online at http://www.jwwaterhouse.com

The reappearance of Waterhouse’s Boreas in the saleroom in the mid 1990s caused a sensation as it had been lost for 90 years. Called Boreas after the north wind in Greek mythology, the work shows a young girl in a windswept landscape. In 1904 the Royal Academy notes described the subject as: “In wind-blown draperies of slate-colour and blue, a girl passes through a spring landscape accented by pink blossom and daffodils”. Since then, the picture’s whereabouts have been unknown and it was referred to as “lost” in Anthony Hobson’s 1989 biography of Waterhouse.

The painting was sold for £848,500 ($1,293,962) – the record price for a Waterhouse at the time.

After putting hundreds of hours into re-imagining this painting I have decided to offer it for sale as a limited edition print in much higher resolution for $200 Cdn. I will sell the full painting or this cropped one. This decision was made after seeing an “original” oil by someone in Vietnam for $500 a month ago. Please contact me via my website at http://www.artbyinglis.com if you are interested in purchasing a print.  I would like to connect with anyone who is doing digital restoration of any of the old masters paintings. The implications of this kind of work may be far reaching. This is very demanding work, requiring great attention to details of color and texture, so as to retain the sense of the original while removing the flaws of time.

Boreas recreated by Inglis

Karl Jung Portrait

Karl Jung Portrait

Forever Jung#mce_temp_url#

I have been thinking a lot about Karl Jung lately, especially after seeing the fantastic illustrations in his newly published “Red Book” which has caused ripples in many realms other than that of psychology.
Creating the book apparently led Jung to reformulate how he worked with his analytical patients. One especially profound example appeared in a self-published book written by a former client, in which she recalls Jung’s advice for processing what went on in the deeper and sometimes frightening parts of her mind.
“I should advise you to put it all down as beautifully as you can–in some beautifully bound book,” Jung instructed her. “It will seem as if you were making the visions banal–but then you need to do that–then you are freed from the power of them. . . . Then when these things are in some precious book you can go to the book & turn over the pages & for you it will be your church–your cathedral–the silent places of your spirit where you will find renewal. If anyone tells you that it is morbid or neurotic and you listen to them–then you will lose your soul–for in that book is your soul.”
I would add that in my own life I have experienced a symbolic journey of the spirit from self to no-self, from form to emptiness and back to form. Meditation, therapy, journaling, painting and my work with Tarot & Astrology are all interwoven in my own sacred “book”.
Here is a recent painting composed of hundreds of abstract shapes in various colors that are distinctly different from skin tones. I like to think that Jung must have had moments of joy and I wanted to portray that feeling in this work.